Meaningful learning through translation

Fantastic writing in English is kind of disreputable, but fantastic writing in translation is the summit – Jonathoan Lethem

There’s a lot of pros and cons for getting language learners to translate, though I question how much is learned from a standard translation task. imagesHowever, in my IB Diploma Spanish Ab initio course I recently prepared a nice little activity which involved translating a text about bullying. Moreover, what made it successful was the peer correcting and reflecting at the end of the task thus making it well rounded. Ab initio courses are special in that it’s not simply a matter of teaching the language, the IB have constructed a SL course where teachers must prepare students to do specific tasks in the target language based on a set of 20 topics. Students should be able to describe pictures and discuss themes, write short paragraphs related to the topics and answer comprehension and language questions on texts. There is also a researched based individual written assignment to top off the challenge. All these must be achieved in less than 2 years making it vigorous, particularly to those who have no prior knowledge of the target language.

When I started last year with my G11’s they were not independent learners and wanted to be spoon fed. It took considerable time explaining the exam criteria and assignments as well as getting them to accept my approach of learning the language through a series of topics and expecting students to self study grammar and vocabulary with my guidance. After covering the basics, I slowly started introducing more independent approaches to learning pushing the responsibility onto the learners. Babbel and Duolingo are useful tools for students to pick up the basics alone, although my students didn’t take to it. Duolingo even allows you to set up groups for teachers.

Now in the second year of the course, as any teacher with G12 students, I worry too much about their progress and am pushing them to be able to achieve at their best in the final exam. I have noticed that this year most of my students have achieved a fairly good level Spanish where the work done in the first year somehow all starts to advance. We still have a long way to go, but my constant identifying areas of study for each individual and pushing them seems to be paying off. Recently we read some articles about bullying, one of the more complex themes related to the topic of education. From the texts read and Paper 1 preparation I prepared a simple vocabulary quiz (formative assessment) to confirm the students were studying the vocabulary.

To take it a step further I came across a short summary written by a English Ab initio student on a similar text on bullying. Mr Fernando and Antonio Luna provide very complete resources for this course. It seemed like a nice little task to round of the theme. My students are unfortunately very google translate (or any other translator) orientated.

Final translation
Final translation

I have been decreasing the use translators by demonstrating the limitations from our course perspective and reminding them they will not be allowed to use it in the final exam. It’s a useful tool for specific moments. Rather than simply asking students to translate the text and correct it, I approached it as follows. In pairs I asked students to to translate the text with a good old dictionary as their only external tool. I then mixed pairs allowing them to compare one translation with another. Next, students were asked to compare these and make a third translation which was fused from the first attempts. This forces to students to discuss and examine the language they used and also requires them to collaborate and think at higher levels. Finally, I projected my translation and got the students to copy it and compare differences with their texts. We discussed specific grammar structures, vocabulary and reflected on differences between English and Spanish. The sensation I got after the class is that students had successfully learned from this activity, worked collaboratively and my role was guiding and facilitating rather than spoon feeding content.

Author: Niels Zwart

Living in Rabat, Morocco. Also lived in The Netherlands, UK, Spain and China. EAL in Secondary, English Literature, Social Studies, IBDP Spanish ab initio. Family man, music, reading, cooking and eating, tennis and table tennis, and traveling.

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