Category Archives: Inquiry

Multilingual environments promote (authentic) international-mindedness. – IN CONCLUSION

Wow! What a time we’ve had exploring the title of this post!
A big thank you to my inquiry group – @andymccallum, @chelseamwoods, @mclouter, @maudeboyer and @tinamoyale – for giving me another positive, group work and collaboration experience for the books! 🙂

Hard at work! :)
Hard at work in ‘our spot’! 🙂

We really pulled it together as a team to have a look at what ISPP is doing to cater to our multilingual population, why we think we should be promoting multilingualism in our teaching and learning spaces, where and how we see room for improvement as well as coming up with (using resources shared on SPELTAC/other PD @ ISPP) ideas and activities that can help you create a multilingual OR language neutral learning environment.  We shared one of these activities by having participants in our session complete it and the rest of our workshop showed a compilation video of our efforts. I will link this here soon, but for now, here’s the slideshow – including resources and links – that might be applicable to your classroom and promote multilingualism:

Screen Shot 2017-03-12 at 7.27.14 PMhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9j6anD8uUzHRmxZanlKSS1IcDQ/view

And here’s the link to our full presentation video:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5q2nmrXicfsY2x5eGJWMHdCU2c/view

Staff participants took turns drawing body parts, not knowing what the bit above theirs looked like!
Staff participants took turns drawing body parts, not knowing what the bit above theirs looked like!

OH, I also learned what lingual meant and made some good connections so I’ll always think of other ways to be multilingual other than speaking!
LINGUAL DEFINITION

I also picked up a lot of new learning! From the text type activity I did with @mthoutermangmail-com and @tinamoyale and @catherinelaing, I gained a bigger picture, hands-on experience look at how I can be introducing ‘audience’ to my writers.

SPELTAC GROUP

I attended another session that challenged my group’s inquiry and ideas by suggesting maybe the multilingual bit doesn’t have to be so visual for it to be there. They even had some student support to back-it-up which challenged me to think of how we can find a balance and meet everyone’s needs and desires…if we can! I mean, that’s the goal! 🙂

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These guys started with a cool quiz and offered an alternative point of view on multilingualism.

I also enjoyed my other sessions, the TED talks and the conversation and interactions surrounding the success of day and complimenting Marcelle on a job well done! 🙂

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Rachel’s presentation got me in the zone…both of ’em!

 

 

 

 

 

I look forward to following through (or continuing to do so) with some of my group’s ideas and suggestions and I look forward to trying out some new ideas in my classroom tomorrow!

Thanks for the inspiration, everyone! AND thanks for the awesome feedback! 🙂
SPELTAC Feedback 1 SPELTAC Feedback 2

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#awesome #SPELTAC #thanks

 

But how can we communicate #perspective?

I just watched a video that inspired me to want to write about a word – a topic – a state of being (or have been): perspective. I think about perspective a lot. I wonder is it possible to have perspective if you’ve not experienced something first hand? I mean, I can’t truly know what it’s like to be a learner of English as an additional language, so how can I have true perspective about what it’s like to be one of my students who is? I really ponder this a lot and tend to lean more towards that perspective IS linked to life experiences…

HOWEVER…

Every once in a while, I’ll see a video that just…gives me perspective. Somehow, seeing a special video that was made by someone (or involves someone/something) that has experienced something I’ve not,  can just give me a solid feeling of understanding; I feel like it shows me success in perspective-giving. And that’s a powerful thing.

http://www.upworthy.com/a-moving-short-film-explores-what-its-really-like-to-live-with-adhd?c=reccon3

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Now, while being an English as an additional language learner is not the same as having Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (or another learning ‘disability’), it is another thing I didn’t really feel I had ‘perspective’ of…until watching this video.

Now, the wheels are turning.

IF a video can portray such powerful perspective for me, what can I be doing to get that same powerful perspective of my students and what it’s like to be them?

If we could all have more perspective about what it’s like to be our students, wouldn’t we be better teachers?

Added as an after thought:
There’s an ABC television show called “Switched at Birth” that is based on just what the title states and it just so happens that one of the children switched at birth is deaf. A great deal of the show is done in silence with only ASL and subtitles to show communication. It’s a weird watch for someone, I suppose, but I appreciate the show because it gives me a perspective that I wouldn’t otherwise have into a world of silence.

How do our ‘environments’ support multilingualism?

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve spent some time thinking about how my classroom (learning environment) lends itself to or helps my students…no matter what their level of English understanding may be. On top of that, I’ve been having a bit of a creep on my students’ single subject lessons to see how these teaching and learning environments (“classrooms”…?) accommodate for our language learning student. Through doing all of this, I hope to gain a better understanding of:
A) what an ‘environment’ is.
B) what multilingualism looks like in different learning environments.

The single subject lessons that my students attend are very movement oriented and provide kinesthetic outlets for students to express their understandings from the lessons/units; I consider this a pretty big positive for a student who may not be able to communicate confidently verbally. Art, Music, PE and Swimming lessons are all pretty active and the students always seem enthusiastic about attending…with the exception of a child who all of a sudden hates swimming now.

In my wanderings, I wondered how these photos might elicit conversation about multilingualism in our teaching and learning environments…
I think these photos say a LOT and I still want to know more so I made a point of asking my students about them and what they mean. What might they mean to you, multi-linguistically speaking?

art music peThanks to @msdana, @leigh, @andymunn and @annenewman for letting me observe you, for welcoming my feedback and most of all, for engaging all of the Rainbow Fish in your lessons! 🙂