Category Archives: Connectivism

Multilingual environments promote (authentic) international-mindedness. – IN CONCLUSION

Wow! What a time we’ve had exploring the title of this post!
A big thank you to my inquiry group – @andymccallum, @chelseamwoods, @mclouter, @maudeboyer and @tinamoyale – for giving me another positive, group work and collaboration experience for the books! 🙂

Hard at work! :)
Hard at work in ‘our spot’! 🙂

We really pulled it together as a team to have a look at what ISPP is doing to cater to our multilingual population, why we think we should be promoting multilingualism in our teaching and learning spaces, where and how we see room for improvement as well as coming up with (using resources shared on SPELTAC/other PD @ ISPP) ideas and activities that can help you create a multilingual OR language neutral learning environment.  We shared one of these activities by having participants in our session complete it and the rest of our workshop showed a compilation video of our efforts. I will link this here soon, but for now, here’s the slideshow – including resources and links – that might be applicable to your classroom and promote multilingualism:

Screen Shot 2017-03-12 at 7.27.14 PMhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9j6anD8uUzHRmxZanlKSS1IcDQ/view

And here’s the link to our full presentation video:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5q2nmrXicfsY2x5eGJWMHdCU2c/view

Staff participants took turns drawing body parts, not knowing what the bit above theirs looked like!
Staff participants took turns drawing body parts, not knowing what the bit above theirs looked like!

OH, I also learned what lingual meant and made some good connections so I’ll always think of other ways to be multilingual other than speaking!
LINGUAL DEFINITION

I also picked up a lot of new learning! From the text type activity I did with @mthoutermangmail-com and @tinamoyale and @catherinelaing, I gained a bigger picture, hands-on experience look at how I can be introducing ‘audience’ to my writers.

SPELTAC GROUP

I attended another session that challenged my group’s inquiry and ideas by suggesting maybe the multilingual bit doesn’t have to be so visual for it to be there. They even had some student support to back-it-up which challenged me to think of how we can find a balance and meet everyone’s needs and desires…if we can! I mean, that’s the goal! 🙂

RUZF9115

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These guys started with a cool quiz and offered an alternative point of view on multilingualism.

I also enjoyed my other sessions, the TED talks and the conversation and interactions surrounding the success of day and complimenting Marcelle on a job well done! 🙂

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Rachel’s presentation got me in the zone…both of ’em!

 

 

 

 

 

I look forward to following through (or continuing to do so) with some of my group’s ideas and suggestions and I look forward to trying out some new ideas in my classroom tomorrow!

Thanks for the inspiration, everyone! AND thanks for the awesome feedback! 🙂
SPELTAC Feedback 1 SPELTAC Feedback 2

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#awesome #SPELTAC #thanks

 

Empathy vs. Sympathy

I just stumbled across this video that discusses on sympathy vs. empathy.

Up until a very short time ago, I was under the impression that it was impossible to have empathy if you don’t have first-hand experience. I could have all the sympathy in the world, but not empathy. I eventually learned, as I did with ‘perspective’, there are other ways to experience the ‘unknown’ without doing it first hand. I really do find ways to connect and have empathy for all of my students so that I can better cater to their learning…and perhaps this is a good visual to share for teaching this learner attitude.

This video does a great job of showing this whilst tying in connectivism and real life scenarios with creative graphics. Thanks for this new #perspective, @BrenéBrown! 🙂

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-9-07-17-pmhttps://youtu.be/1Evwgu369Jw

 

How do our ‘environments’ support multilingualism?

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve spent some time thinking about how my classroom (learning environment) lends itself to or helps my students…no matter what their level of English understanding may be. On top of that, I’ve been having a bit of a creep on my students’ single subject lessons to see how these teaching and learning environments (“classrooms”…?) accommodate for our language learning student. Through doing all of this, I hope to gain a better understanding of:
A) what an ‘environment’ is.
B) what multilingualism looks like in different learning environments.

The single subject lessons that my students attend are very movement oriented and provide kinesthetic outlets for students to express their understandings from the lessons/units; I consider this a pretty big positive for a student who may not be able to communicate confidently verbally. Art, Music, PE and Swimming lessons are all pretty active and the students always seem enthusiastic about attending…with the exception of a child who all of a sudden hates swimming now.

In my wanderings, I wondered how these photos might elicit conversation about multilingualism in our teaching and learning environments…
I think these photos say a LOT and I still want to know more so I made a point of asking my students about them and what they mean. What might they mean to you, multi-linguistically speaking?

art music peThanks to @msdana, @leigh, @andymunn and @annenewman for letting me observe you, for welcoming my feedback and most of all, for engaging all of the Rainbow Fish in your lessons! 🙂

Language… ‘Outside of the Box’

Since beginning our individual (and now group) inquiries into language, I’ve always had it on the back of my mind. What is language? What is language?

Yes, I can tell you that language is verbal and non-verbal and I can tell you that at ISPP,  we’re all ELL learners and teachers, but beyond that, what are the languages that we speak? What classifies a language as a language? How many are there? Who rights or wrongs a language? And so on and so forth.

From the moment we’re born, we’re predisposed to factors which will inform the languages we’ll learn for the purpose of communication. That’s a mouthful. But it’s true. We may not think about some of the factors as being influential because of our privileges of being able to communicate how we do, but for many, verbal communication might never be an option for language learning.

Now, let me introduce you to this wonderful human being. Trust me, it’s worth the few minutes to watch:
(Click on the link below to be redirected…the embed and photo hyperlink options aren’t working!:)

screen-shot-2016-10-02-at-9-07-15-pmhttp://www.sbs.com.au/news/thefeed/article/2016/09/24/brain-changed-walking-kokoda-trail-cerebral-palsy

“I speak three languages: English, German and spastic, which is my native tongue.” – Andrew Short

Pretty incredible, right? And perhaps not something we think about when we think about language in the traditional sense. Aside from being an inspiration in overcoming something so many thought he wouldn’t be able to do, Andrew has blown our conceptions of ‘language’ out the door as well.

How many other languages are spoken that we perhaps don’t recognize as a ‘real’ language?

Just some food for thought!

What about the Z’s?!

Ok, this is something I’ve been concerned about for a while. And it boils down to this…

images-1HOW DOES THE LETTER ‘Z’ FEEL?

So, you’re in the alphabet. Wayyyyyyyyy back at the end. Like the kid with the ‘z’ last name always being called last, Z hangs out waiting for everyone else to come first…it really is no wonder we use it to show ‘snoring’! “Zzzzzzzz” says Z.  To make matters worse, we go and create this incredible vocabulary across multiple languages that just doesn’t showcase many begins with ‘z’ words. It’s an alphabetic tragedy. …or maybe it’s what makes Z so special.

When I grew up, I obviously learned Canadian English. To me at that time, that meant British English because we spelled things colour, favourite, neighbour, grey and centre as opposed to American English (color, favorite, neighbor, gray, center). However, as I interact with (and operate within) British English systems, I realize Canadian English is just somewhere inbetween British and American English. The reason? Our relationship with ‘z’!….though we do say it ‘zed’ and not ‘zee’.
We spell organize, realize, accessorize and characterize with ‘z’s. British English uses ‘s’ in place of ‘z’ in these instances. This minimizes the use of ‘z’ even further in the entirety of the English language…but…is it worth it for the ‘z’? Would it make you feel special? Would you feel unique in only being used every so often?

Aside from these guilty feelings I have about ‘z’ being left out, phonetically, ‘z’ vs. ‘s’ poses a tricky problem! When I investigated further into the ‘z’ and ‘s’ usage, this video came up:
(I’ve tried to embed it but it won’t work so click on the photo below to be redirected! 🙂

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 8.02.43 PM

If you’re still reading, did you practice making the ‘s’ and ‘z’ sound?
Now, using this rule, say, “This is ridiculous.”
Now, say, “This iz ridiculous.”
Hrmmmmm. I see a contradiction to the rules here.
I’m a native (Canadian) English speaker and I am stumped. I definitely don’t ever say “is” without activating my vocal chords!

HOW DOES AN EAL LEARNER FEEL?

Now, I’m an EAL learner that has to try and write English for the first time. I’d imagine I’d be hella confused! I’d probably be busting out ‘z’s more often than I’m supposed to.

My investigation into ‘z’ really has been something I’ve always thought about and I don’t know what possessed me to inquire more into it today. I have given it a lot of thought – how might this letter pertain to differentiation that happens in my classroom? – And I’ve come to this conclusion…

THOSE EAL LEARNERS IN OUR CLASSES ARE THE ‘Z’S!

They’re important, even though they don’t speak up/out much.
They might be dead last finishing a task AND they might be used to waiting until dead last for you to be able to give them the attention they need/deserve.
They pop up with words (and insights/knowledge/ideas) when you least expect it (is should totally be iz!).
They’re so much more obvious when there’s two of ’em (so good for them!).
We must NOT let them fall asleep resulting from boredom…we need to make school especially fun and accessible for these students!

How do YOU think our EAL learners are ‘z’s in our classroom alphabets?


Credits:

To the zany and everyday ‘z’ user, Ms. Liz and Ms. ‘Z Activist’ Paula for their British insights/interviews
To my Canadian/Khmer Team for entertaining my inquiry
http://mentalfloss.com/article/62639/why-it-zed-britain-and-zee-america – Why is it “Zed” in Britain, and “Zee” in America?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5iL_pu5CNs How to Pronounce “S” vs. “Z” Sounds | English Lessons
http://cliparts.co/clipart/358267 – Letter ‘Z’ download