What about the Z’s?!

Ok, this is something I’ve been concerned about for a while. And it boils down to this…

images-1HOW DOES THE LETTER ‘Z’ FEEL?

So, you’re in the alphabet. Wayyyyyyyyy back at the end. Like the kid with the ‘z’ last name always being called last, Z hangs out waiting for everyone else to come first…it really is no wonder we use it to show ‘snoring’! “Zzzzzzzz” says Z.  To make matters worse, we go and create this incredible vocabulary across multiple languages that just doesn’t showcase many begins with ‘z’ words. It’s an alphabetic tragedy. …or maybe it’s what makes Z so special.

When I grew up, I obviously learned Canadian English. To me at that time, that meant British English because we spelled things colour, favourite, neighbour, grey and centre as opposed to American English (color, favorite, neighbor, gray, center). However, as I interact with (and operate within) British English systems, I realize Canadian English is just somewhere inbetween British and American English. The reason? Our relationship with ‘z’!….though we do say it ‘zed’ and not ‘zee’.
We spell organize, realize, accessorize and characterize with ‘z’s. British English uses ‘s’ in place of ‘z’ in these instances. This minimizes the use of ‘z’ even further in the entirety of the English language…but…is it worth it for the ‘z’? Would it make you feel special? Would you feel unique in only being used every so often?

Aside from these guilty feelings I have about ‘z’ being left out, phonetically, ‘z’ vs. ‘s’ poses a tricky problem! When I investigated further into the ‘z’ and ‘s’ usage, this video came up:
(I’ve tried to embed it but it won’t work so click on the photo below to be redirected! 🙂

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 8.02.43 PM

If you’re still reading, did you practice making the ‘s’ and ‘z’ sound?
Now, using this rule, say, “This is ridiculous.”
Now, say, “This iz ridiculous.”
Hrmmmmm. I see a contradiction to the rules here.
I’m a native (Canadian) English speaker and I am stumped. I definitely don’t ever say “is” without activating my vocal chords!

HOW DOES AN EAL LEARNER FEEL?

Now, I’m an EAL learner that has to try and write English for the first time. I’d imagine I’d be hella confused! I’d probably be busting out ‘z’s more often than I’m supposed to.

My investigation into ‘z’ really has been something I’ve always thought about and I don’t know what possessed me to inquire more into it today. I have given it a lot of thought – how might this letter pertain to differentiation that happens in my classroom? – And I’ve come to this conclusion…

THOSE EAL LEARNERS IN OUR CLASSES ARE THE ‘Z’S!

They’re important, even though they don’t speak up/out much.
They might be dead last finishing a task AND they might be used to waiting until dead last for you to be able to give them the attention they need/deserve.
They pop up with words (and insights/knowledge/ideas) when you least expect it (is should totally be iz!).
They’re so much more obvious when there’s two of ’em (so good for them!).
We must NOT let them fall asleep resulting from boredom…we need to make school especially fun and accessible for these students!

How do YOU think our EAL learners are ‘z’s in our classroom alphabets?


Credits:

To the zany and everyday ‘z’ user, Ms. Liz and Ms. ‘Z Activist’ Paula for their British insights/interviews
To my Canadian/Khmer Team for entertaining my inquiry
http://mentalfloss.com/article/62639/why-it-zed-britain-and-zee-america – Why is it “Zed” in Britain, and “Zee” in America?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5iL_pu5CNs How to Pronounce “S” vs. “Z” Sounds | English Lessons
http://cliparts.co/clipart/358267 – Letter ‘Z’ download

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