anita mathur

  • Thanks for this post Nicole. I plan to discuss this idea with my G3 class this week.

  • As a fifty something the world of social media is pretty relatively new to me and at times overwhelming and somewhat scary! As much as there are fears about the use of social media it is clearly part of our […]

    • Hi Anita, thank you for sharing these fabulous examples of how Twitter can really expand student as well as our own learning, from Maths to reading and Unit of Inquiry! If we engage in Connected learning, we DO get enriched learning from each other and Twitter is the vehicle through which we get the ‘snippets’ to make this happen.

  • anita mathur commented on the post, Digital Reading, on the site myates 10 months, 2 weeks ago

    I too struggle to read on-line for enjoyment but seem to be making progress with reading articles on-line and retaining what I read.
    The strategies in this article are really helpful in supporting students (and me) to read digitally – I will certainly be explicitly teaching some of these skills. Thank you for a thought provoking and informative post.

  • This was so powerful…wonderful to see your students returning to the positive affirmations from the ‘warm fuzzies” to develop their self belief. A wonderful peer feedback tool. I look forward to trying this with my class. Thanks for sharing.

  • anita mathur commented on the post, Talk Talk, on the site WONDERLAND! 12 months ago

    Wow Alison. Thank you for sharing the HEAR strategy – will certainly try this in our class. Learning so much from others. I’ll also check out the Edutopia article.

  • anita mathur commented on the post, Making Learning Visible, on the site WONDERLAND! 12 months ago

    Thanks for your comment Niels. My inquiry group is inquiring into open-ended creative strategies to support language learners. Would love to hear more about the creative strategies you are using with your students.

  • anita mathur commented on the post, Making Learning Visible, on the site WONDERLAND! 12 months ago

    Would love to work on this with your class…have a wonderful resource that could support this. Lets plan for some collaborative lessons. Thank you for sharing my enthusiasm.

  • anita mathur wrote a new post, Talk Talk, on the site WONDERLAND! 1 year ago

    In my classroom talk is essential to everything we do. Children narrating their thinking is crucial to success. By talking together we construct and apply meaning.

    “Dialogic teaching harnesses the power of […]

    • Another blog post that has left me ‘speechless’. I love how you have really linked what talk means for learning to two brilliant classroom examples (one your own). Your own example illustrates beautifully the impact strategies for talk have on learning. It led to a discovery entirely led by the students! The video you refer to was powerful too. I think considering the shyness of the girl and the strong argument she gave, you could so easily picture what would have happened if this strategy had not been employed. The class would have moved on and her ideas left unheard. I share your belief that narrating thinking is crucial to success. Thanks for sharing this wonderful example and your thinking an learning behind it. I will be using this strategy.

      Marcelle

    • “Sometimes, if you know no one else can hear a student answer it might be helpful to….ask a peer to ask the student to repeat it. That way, you are still making the students responsible to their own learning and also it’s a peer that asks her to speak louder, not the teacher.”

      So true. Reading this made me think of an ongoing goal in my classroom to teach the students to listen to each other. I remember reading about the HEAR strategy. This is also used to help students learn the art of listening. But your example goes a step further and teaches the students that THEY can help other students listen and understand.

      I was reading about HEAR an article in EDUTOPIA – BRAIN-BASED LEARNING. Training the Brain to Listen: A Practical Strategy for Student Learning and Classroom Management.

      The HEAR strategy consists of these four steps:

      Halt: Stop whatever else you are doing, end your internal dialogue on other thoughts, and free your mind to pay attention to the person speaking.

      Engage: Focus on the speaker. We suggest a physical component, such as turning your head slightly so that your right ear is toward the speaker as a reminder to be engaged solely in listening.

      Anticipate: By looking forward to what the speaker has to say, you are acknowledging that you will likely learn something new and interesting, which will enhance your attention.

      Replay: Think about what the speaker is saying. Analyze and paraphrase it in your mind or in discussion with the speaker and other classmates. Replaying the information will aid in understanding and remembering what you have learned.

      Thanks Anita. An excellent reminder of a simple way we can encourage students to speak up and be heard.

      • Wow Alison. Thank you for sharing the HEAR strategy – will certainly try this in our class. Learning so much from others. I’ll also check out the Edutopia article.

      • Love the HEAR strategy! So important to explicitly teach these skills.

  • Thanks Dana. I will certainly be checking these artists out and finding you for an in person chat. Challenging “social norms” is certainly something I would like to bring into our classroom discussions and the work of these artists would be a meaningful way of doing so.

  • Wow….what an insightful and thought provoking blog post. It has raised many questions in my mind too and made me reflect on personal experiences. I remember being told by a colleague that I was “culturally white” when I described myself as identifying as both Asian and European. I also wonder how to address examples of single stories in…[Read more]

  • I enjoyed your post Lisa and strongly agree that explicitly teaching conflict resolution in school is very important. Today I also posted about the theme of peace too. Hopefully we can foster the learning from ‘Peace One Day’ to further develop a culture of collaboration and mutual respect across the school.

  • I really like this idea Alison. I wondered about using this as a way for students to also “map” events in a story.

  • Making Learning Visible 

    One of the challenges I noted in my class is finding ways for students to capture their thinking in a way that is meaningful yet developmentally appropriate for them, while maintaining […]

    • A very interesting blog for me to read as I am using similar creative strategies in secondary (in another school). What struck me in the reflection is your comment about the freedom students felt without the constraints of a structured worksheet. So true. In mixed ability classes of all types I often see students struggling to comprehend a worksheet that seems dead easy to a teacher or even a peer. Just goes to show how different we all are and trying different strategies allows the students to learn about how they learn, and then develop their own techniques.

      • Thanks for your comment Niels. My inquiry group is inquiring into open-ended creative strategies to support language learners. Would love to hear more about the creative strategies you are using with your students.

        • Some of the creative strategies are based around breaking down and visualizing students work path and content. With literature for example, this involves helping students find ways of remembering/understanding concepts of a novel/article by using background information, characters, literary elements, etc often visualizing the learning and thinking. It can be done individually, pairs, groups using pen and paper to tech (i.e.mind map apps). My blogs go into details…The more creative and adventurous I get, the better the learning gets.

    • Anita! This is so cool! I envy some people’s ability to sketchnote and you seem to have a whole class who may be very good at it by now! Maybe they’d be interested in having some KG students for a lesson? I have a beginner EAL student who communicates fantastically through drawings so he’d probably love a lesson like this! I’m definitely gonna lead a lesson and use your post for inspiration! 🙂

      • Would love to work on this with your class…have a wonderful resource that could support this. Lets plan for some collaborative lessons. Thank you for sharing my enthusiasm.

  • CREATIVE STRATEGIES

    Statement of Inquiry:
    Strategies that match students learning needs help them to access language and content.

    Inquiry questions:
    How can students adjust strategies to show their level of understanding

    How can students adjust strategies to show their level of understanding?

    What scaffolds can I provide for students to be…[Read more]

  • Yes, our blog is http://msanitaclass.blogspot.co.uk/ we also have a Twitter account @msanitasclass
    My blog on speltac is called Wonderland. Look forward to connecting with you and sharing ideas.

  • Hi Shanna, great to hear from you. I’m sending you a message via Twitter to connect. Do you have a class blog/Twitter account as this would also be a great way to share learning?

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